Review of Rankpop.com Email Message

Update

There has been an update to this event here: Rankpop didn’t honor opt-out.

Disclaimer

I’m not affiliated with nor do I use RankPop.com services. This is my opinion and does not reflect the view of someone who’s actually used rankpop.com; This review was in response to a client asking for me to look into an email they received.

Since writing the original review, the owner of RankPop.com reached out to us and provided us with more accurate information. I was very impressed with how polite well mannered he is.

Did you get Illegal-Spam from RankPop.com?

From what we are able to tell – no, RankPop.com does unsolicited commercial emails- which is not the same thing as Illegal-Spam. Reviewing them more thoroughly, from what I’m able to check, they do comply with the CAN-SPAM Act. Your state and local laws may have more strict rules about Spam, but as far as we’re able to tell, they do comply with Federal Law.

This means that if you get an email from them, and you don’t want them to email you ever again- you should use the unsubscribe link they provide. If you mark the message as spam, this may end up causing legitimate email to be blocked.

Here is an email one of my clients received from them. I’ve removed links and will talk about the email down below:

From:rankpop@mxgrid.com On Behalf Of Patrick Miller
Sent: Tuesday, August 07, 2012 x:xx AM
To: YourName
Subject: Domain.com Infographic Marketing Question
 
Happy Tuesday!

My name is Patrick, and my team and I were talking about Domain.com yesterday, and I’m excited to chat with you.

SEO is dead. Did you read the article in Forbes Magazine? (link removed)Here’s a link to it along with our opinion on it…

I created a report for Domain.com, (which there’s a link to below) that shows the keywords that you’re currently paying to rank for in Google (looks like there’s about x of them) as well as the keywords you’re showing up for organically (I’m seeing about x in the top x). We do these reports to help people get to know us.

I’ll be calling to followup and want to make sure that the right person has this report so I can go over it with them, so if you’re not that person, I would REALLY appreciate you passing it along to whoever is.

My team helps more than 200 companies with their internet marketing. We would like to talk with you about:

  1. Create something really awesome for Domain.com like:
    1. An infographic
    2. A tool for your industry
    3. A widget
    4. A contest
  2. Place it on Domain.com
  3. Get whatever we’ve created talked about on a ton of authority websites that often talk about your niche.

We use things like Alexa, MozRank, PageRank, etc. to determine the best places to pitch your content to.

This will create extremely high quality links to your website and increase your visibility not only from the people who read the sites that talk about you, but in the search engine result pages as well.

We call this form of high quality SEO “content marketing” or “inbound marketing.” And it’s EXACTLY what Google’s latest updates to their algorithm are rewarding.

Give me a call at 855-RANKPOP (855-726-5767) and dial extension 701 and we can do a quick GoToMeeting to talk specifics. Or, if you prefer, reply to this email and let me know when I should call you.

Thanks!

Oh, (link removed)here’s a link to that report on Domain.com, by the way:

Patrick Miller
(link removed)RankPop.com
425 North Prince Street
Lancaster, PA 17603
855-726-5767 x 701

(link removed)There are a couple of videos on our homepage that explain who we are and what we do really clearly.

(youtube video link removed)

If you’d like to never receive emails from RankPop again, simply visit our (link removed)unsubscribe page.

So what is the message about?

They are advertising a legal/legitimate, non-spam approach to marketing your business on the internet.

Why would the above email look like spam:

Its a template message that just puts in your email and domain name. Keep in mind though that just because you use the same resume when applying at different locations doesn’t mean you’re a spammer.

Why the email isn’t illegal spam:

As far as we can tell, it complies with the CAN-SPAM Act. They provide an ‘unsubscribe’ option, they state their legal business address and identify themselves. Although we can’t verify how the email addresses are harvested, the owner of rankpop assured us that they do comply with the CAN-SPAM Act.

Is their site safe?

If you go to their site, expect to have video with sound start playing on certain pages. (Heads up if you’re at a work environment and don’t have your speakers turned down.)

As far as we can tell, their site is safe to visit and browse.

Is their company legit?

Although we can’t say weather or not what they do works- we have been able to verify:

  • They are an actual company. (Don’t need to worry about funds escaping over seas.)
  • They are responsive. (Got emails replied within an hour (even at odd hours).)
  • They are active.

Bottom Line

Originally we thought they were just a fly-by spammer, but upon looking into RankPop.com more, and considering how well mannered and responsive they are, we’d have to say we consider them sincere and responsive.

If you’ve had an experience with them, let us know down below.

Do you agree with the content of this article? Rate accordingly.

(3 votes, average: 4.67 out of 5)
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4 Responses to Review of Rankpop.com Email Message

  1. Hi – I’m sorry you feel this way about my email outreach. My outreach is pretty straightforward, really. I try to find folks who have websites, and that may be buying keywords in Google AdWords, or currently rank organically for keywords. We strive to put together emails that have helpful information, compiled in a concise, easy to understand way. Our reports pull in data through the use of API’s, from tools that are not available to the average business owner.

    In addition, I typically find contact emails listed on websites, and reach out to website owners through that email address, to offer this informational report.

    I make sure our companies’ physical address is listed on the email, my direct line phone number, as well as a prominent unsubscribe option.

    I understand that you may not want to do business with RankPop, which I’m sorry about, however, the emails I send are CAN-SPAM compliant, and many website owners that I contact find them helpful.

    I’d be happy to discuss this with you, and you can call me at the direct phone number listed in the email.

    Also, I, and my associates do physically monitor the Zopim chat box on our website, and interact with visitors if they wish.

    Cheers,

    Patrick

    • Gonzo says:

      As someone who has also received a similar unsolicited email from you, I can say this much: You are following the pattern of an automated spam email with the sole exception that the CAN-SPAM notice at the bottom is real rather than an email harvester. In my case, the email cited a random page that is blatantly the result of a spider crawl – probably Google, given what you said here, but definitely showing no awareness of what the link is to, leading anyone to assume it was illegal spam, rather than legal unsolicited email.

      If you want to improve the reception to your emails, don’t use a random page off a Google result, go one step deeper and find a relevant page on the site and make the text of your email represent human understanding of the page, not harvested text off the page.

      Also, though you state here you typically use email address listed on the website, the cases where you do not are not helping your case. We received the email on an address that has not been advertised outside our organization in at least the 8 years I’ve been here, if ever.

      It’s only because of this blog post that I’m not seeing it as “illegal spam”, and even at that, this only takes the “illegal” part off, as it is unsolicited and not appropriate for the site the email claims to responded to.

      • Jacob Brown says:

        Yes, I agree completely with your conclusion and point. I updated the post as I want to clarify that we cannot fully verify that they comply with can-spam as we don’t know how or where they get email addresses from. What you described would be considered illegal- to my knowledge automated email harvesters violate can-spam act. So if they are automatically gathering email addresses- then yes, it would be illegal.

        “harvesting electronic mail addresses of the users of a website, proprietary service, or other online public forum operated by another person, without the authorization of such person;”

        It looked they they got my clients email from domain registration.

        But I have no way of telling how they get their addresses other than from what they tell me.

        On a side note- about 90% of spam comments are being placed on this post…

  2. Sherry says:

    I know this is a little off topic but I just wanted to let everyone know how badly RankPop ripped me off. They took my money for 6 months ($3600) and I never saw any results. They kept blaming their lack of results on Google algorithm changes. Lies, lies and more lies. They don’t honor their guarantees. This company is really shady and I don’t recommend anyone doing business with them.

    I recently switched to a more reputable SEO company and I have already seen excellent results in the first four months.

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