MagicMail LinuxMagic Anti Spam Review

If you are considering using MagicMail by LinuxMagix, please consider that it creates difficulty for legitimate small business service providers to send you email.

What is Legitimate Email?

For simplicity, legitimate email complies with FTC Can-Spam Act. Note: a solicitation through email can still comply with the CAN-SPAM Act (such as someone sending you a job resume, or a trade association emailing you and asking you to join them, ect ect).

What was blocked

To clarify: one of my clients wanted to purchase a product from another business, the business had an email address on their website and said to send an email to request instructions on how to purchase the product, my client had their email blocked, I looked into it- found that MagicMail wanted a reverse DNS, let my client know how long it would take, my client opted to purchase a similar product from a different company.

Review of MagicMail

If you are wondering what service providers have to go through when their emails are blocked: Why message was rejected.. Their documentation on how to fix the problem mentions over 15 times that its a problem with the person receiving the error. I believe that documentation should only be about providing information relevent to the subject and it should not be taken as an opportunity to pass blame to the person needing the documentation! If you have trouble getting a reverse dns they let you know “either your upstream provider doesn’t want email servers on it’s network, or you should consider another provider”. So its not their software that’s the problem, its everyone else- and if your provider doesn’t work with their software- you should change your isp…

Ironically, they reply with a message that I would consider spam when they tell you you’re blocked. They just lack the coupon code by their ad.

550-Your message was rejected by this user and was not delivered.
550-Reason: Your IP address [123.456.789.0] appears not to be an email server.
550-Protection provided by: MagicMail version 1.3.2 (http://magicmail.linuxmagic.com)
550-For more information, please visit the URL:
550-http://www.linuxmagic.com/best_practices/check_dynamic_reverse_dns.html
550-or contact your ISP or mail server operator.

How they’ve treated providers

Other than my experience with them, you should consider what others have to say:

Conclusion

Don’t fall for their advertising of ‘Best Practices’, just look at what service providers have to go through to send you email. My client ended up not purchasing from the company that used MagicMail LinuxMagic as the email request for a quote would not go through.

My clients are small businesses (under 30 employees). If your company does business with small businesses, make sure that any “Anti-Spam” solution you setup doesn’t end up blocking your potential customers.

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5 Responses to MagicMail LinuxMagic Anti Spam Review

  1. Russell says:

    Let me say right up front that we use MagicMail are extremely happy with it and are exceptionally happy with the customer support we get from LinuxMagic. MagicMail is a great product. While I will agree that mipspace can be a bit of a pain at times, when we turn it off (you can turn it off) the amount of spam that gets through rises substantially.

  2. onef says:

    Best Practices aren’t an advertisement, they are a collection of procedures compiled by experts for the greater good.

    I’m sorry that your “CAN-SPAM compliant totally legitimate email list with quadruple opt-in and DNA verification” email list didn’t get through to a magicmail user’s hosting provider, but this is hardly a magicmail problem.

    Your rant railing against a feature that could easily be disabled by someone with the proper access demonstrates your lack of understanding of not only this product, but the basics of email administration in general.

    • Jacob Brown says:

      Hi Onef,
      1. I’m saying that they advertise “a collection of procedures compiled by a group of experts”. They list a couple groups that reference these best practices. In the technology industry, groups of experts list what they consider to be best practices- an example would be if Microsoft came out and said “this is how you should setup your Microsoft server” then those would be considered official best practices. However, because there are no official best practices from the original collaboration of groups that created the email messaging protocol- any “best practices” advertised are unofficial, and I would only consider them as suggestions and not the basis for establishing a service.
      2. The email blocked, was a request for how my client could send a payment to purchase a product. I said nothing about “email list”. Did you even read my post? I’ll update it to make it more understandable.
      3. What prompted me to “rant railing” is that their documentation seemed more about passing blame than helping providers comply with what they consider “best practices”. As a service provider, I’m not interested in telling other companies to turn off their spam filters or disable parts of it- I just wanted to know what had to be done to fix the problem.

      I disagree with your remark- Just because I’m not an expert with that product doesn’t mean I don’t understand email administration. Email administration is a huge broad category, whereas this product would be an add-on/sub category.

  3. Colby Last says:

    The obvious answer should be, “you can’t have it all”, especially in IT products.

    You know how a lot of businesses deal with hackers? They block most every country in the world from even accessing their site to begin with. Of course people travelling abroad in china might be a little miffed about that, but that’s how you deal with china who has the largest amount of hackers in the world.

    You know how businesses deal with their own employees leaking company secrets? They ban all instant messengers from the office. That’s because when you are at work talking to someone, it is very easy to leak important information without you even knowing that you are doing it. Example conversation “Hey pete, wanna grab some coffee later?”, “No susan, my boss is about to jump on a plane to italy in about 5 minutes and he needs all hands on board”. Now why would petes boss be going to italy? maybe that rumored merger is going ahead with that italian company is going through afterall. Quick somebody buy that stock!!!

    These aren’t ideal solutions by a long shot, but they get the job done. So many companies take security for granted and then end up getting a virus in their mail posing as a legitimate message. All because some dumbass manager thought the proper security measures were too complicated and restricting.

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